The Guide is Alive!

After a couple of days of work, the refurbished Dark Shadows Episode Guide is open and ready for everyone to return!

It has gotten a great redesign with a clean and easy to use menu.

I have to give a lot of credit to my husband Greg for helping out with a lot of issues on the site design I was having.

Do go and take a look at http://darkshadows.nickbrobeck.com/ and let me know if you have any questions!

Thanks for your support.

-Nick B.

A Change of Heart

In the last post, I talked about how the Dark Shadows Episode Guide I ran looked dated. That remains true

I had an eleventh hour epiphany so to speak after a wonderful article about Dark Shadows appeared in the New York Times a few days ago.

I am fortunate to have befriended Wallace McBride and the excellent people who have curated The Collinsport Historical Society, an awesome blog dedicated to the show. I have even contributed an article over there previously.

When that article appeared a few days ago it got me to thinking… people really did love that episode guide. I did actually get a couple of emails about it. They were nice and cordial.

Long story short. I am giving the guide an overhaul and bringing it back. It’ll take a few days but it’ll get there. I have already started work.

Stay tuned!

Leaving it Behind in the Past

Dark Shadows Bumper Card

Recently I decided it was time to close down the Dark Shadows Episode Guide I had curated on the internet for almost two decades. At the time I was a member of the alt.tv.dark_shadows newsgroup after just discovering the reruns on the Sci-Fi Channel.

There posted just about every day were summaries of the episodes as well as the tape date and air date of the shows. I expanded on this slightly adding in the ABC numbering of the episodes (which is a very weird-ass system to this day) and, where applicable, the Worldvision rerun numbers used when the show was in syndication from 1975-1990.

It never needed updating as pretty much all of the information was there.

So, why did I take it down?

It was feeling really outdated to me. I may bring it back in the future in another form. Who knows. It was just that I didn’t want something online to appear so dated and I don’t have the time currently to give it the makeover it deserves. After all, there are some exciting times ahead in life for me and Greg.

So, the guide is gone from my website for now. It’s in the internet archive preserved for those who want to see it. Just go to nickbrobeck.com/darkshadows and it’ll redirect you there after a few seconds.

 

Dark Shadows: The Leviathans – Week 3

As we continue this journey into this dark mystery we actually start to get some really good performances this week. Here are my very brief thoughts on this week’s episodes. Remember of course that we are still one episode behind due to the unplanned preemption back on November 24th.

Episode 894/895 – Monday 12/1/69

David is still mucking around with that book, hiding it in a puzzle box that has been spray painted to remove the brand names. Evil Barnabas somehow finds out… or rather is clued in to the fact that David has the book.

Also, the baby is now ill. I know these are evil spirits and all but it astounds me that a being who was just created out of thin air can also be just as susceptible to normal human ailments. Greg offered a thought whilst I was writing this that the fever was related to the book being missing, however it was very poorly explained in the plot. I think this a very good explanation as to why I am confused… probably along with the majority of the audience in 1969.

Barnabas takes Philip to the Leviathan altar to try to knock sense into him, more or less.

Marie Wallace excels at characters who are very unnerved, and poor Megan Todd is just getting started. Behold some great acting!

Episode 896 – Tuesday 12/2/69

Dr. Hoffman to the rescue — maybe. One important thing that she is meant to see here is a strange birthmark on the baby. Megan of course doesn’t want her to see the baby. It’s like the evil spirits know who she is all too well, don’t they?

David wants to burn the book. Amy Jennings tries to talk him out of it… but the book, or someone, has other plans. It just happens to open to that freaking Naga symbol!

He reads the book and understands it. He’s come a long way from that crystal ball he had back in the early days of the show, hasn’t he?

Now we come to a scene that I thought was good and bad all at the same time. Julia is supposed to meet a Mr. Corey. To her surprise, it’s not a Mr., but a lady, Olivia Corey. After a few awkward lines back and forth about each other’s interest in Tate paintings I think the viewer is convinced that this should really be the modern version of Amanda Harris from the 1897 storyline. (If you didn’t add 2+2 to equal 4 immediately, you probably shouldn’t be watching this show at all.)

My apologies if the end of that last paragraph seemed a bit condescending, please don’t think it too harsh.

So, David is a Leviathan now. I am not shocked the writers are doing this with his character. I mean, a kid who took a bleeder valve off his car trying to off his own father of course is going to become a Leviathan!

Episode 897 – Wednesday 12/3/69

Now, this episode has it all for me. Multiple characters and that great level of spooky that only Dark Shadows could do well.

Let’s start with Chris being visited by Crazy Jenny. Marie Wallace is on record as having said that Jenny was her favorite character that she played on the show. You can tell here that she was loving every scene-chewing moment.

To that fact, the Chris Jennings story, continued from before the 1897 flashback, is still the best thing the show has going right now. Admittedly it’s being treated as a kind of B plot with the Leviathans around, but still…

Barnabas has Philip in the secret room brainwashing him with a Barnabas speech on tape. This is the best tape recorder gimmick since Dr. Lang!

The end of the show is a testament to the creepy factor that Dark Shadows could only do so well. Just go and watch the whole end of Act III with Megan constantly being frightened by things in the antique shop. The lack of music, or any regular sounds for that matter, is what makes this scene. I know, there is a studio light visible here and there, but that is always the charming and endearing this about this show.

Oh, and watch out for the stagehand at the beginning of the credits pouring more dry ice into the cauldron.

Episode 898 – Thursday 12/4/69

Before I summarize this episode it is important to point out that we are one day behind on the intended airdates. The unplanned preemption on Monday November 24th will not be made up until January. The reason I point that out will become very obvious.

Julia decides to hold a seance to try and contact Quentin. I don’t understand why she asks David to be a part of it. I know that David had his beef with the ghost of Quentin months ago, but why would Dr. Hoffman want to put him in that kind of danger again? It just doesn’t click with me.

Now, here is why I pointed out that date above. Paul Stoddard inexplicably picks up a pen and circles a day on the calendar…

That’s right, December 4th! Keep in mind that this episode was originally supposed to air on December 3rd. OK, back to the seance.

Jamison Collins speaks through David at the seance and tells everyone that Quentin cannot be reached. It’s one of the shorter seances on the show and definitely the calmest.

Paul gets a letter from Megan at the antique store…

Great, another reminder of the airdate that should have been, lol. Maybe Paul should have paid? (I know, obvious statement.) But, look, he’s got a new tattoo!

That damn Naga symbol again! Curses!

Episode 899 – Friday 12/5/69

The inevitable confrontation between Paul and Elizabeth finally happens in this show. It’s time to play the Family Feud… 7 years before it debuted on ABC! The scene here was very well written. However, the dialouge and the emotions were so hot and heavy that we have quite a few line flubs and desperate looks for a teleprompter. Again, that is the charming aspect of the production method of live-to-tape that I love so much.

Later, we are at the Blue Whale with a tune of varying pitch on the jukebox. Paul meets this day player Sailor. Greg instantly recognized the actor, Ken McMillan. He is more well known for playing the minister in the famous Chuckles the Clown episode of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” However, this plot is no laughing matter at all.

So this sailor has told Paul to draw a huge pentagram on the floor of his room and sit in it to be protected from the Leviathans. We’ll see if this will work… or will Dark Shadows not play by the rules of evil doings. Anything is possible! We end with a knock on the door and a turn of the doorknob. This Thursday cliffhanger sure makes a good Friday cliffhanger as well!

Overall, I think we are moving very good with some good elements of the storyline. However, I can’t help thinking that the viewer is still confused as heck over just who and what the Leviathans are and what they mean to do.

Dark Shadows: The Leviathans – Week 2

Monday 11/24/69

Dark Shadows was preempted for ABC coverage of the Apollo 12 splashdown. Coverage was slated to run from 3:30-5:30pm Eastern time. The splashdown occurred at 3:58pm Eastern Time. I am guessing that this preemption was not planned for because for the next several weeks the episode numbers will be off by one. More on this in a later article.

Episode 891 – Tuesday 11/25/69

Are we surprised that the Todds were at the door? I wasn’t the first time I saw this plot in the late 90’s on the SciFi Channel. And oh my, what a charming locket indeed.

So if the audience paid attention to the closing credits last week they already know this mysterious guy hanging around Collinsport is Paul Stoddard. Guess nobody thought to keep the surprise a secret, did they? He calls Collinwood, asks Maggie Evans for Elizabeth, then hangs up. Looks like a standard soap plot to me at this point.

Barnabas decides to give the Leviathan box to the Todds. Just you wait until you see what you bargained for!

Paul Stoddard shows up at an empty Evans cottage and talks to Maggie about what is going on at Collinwood. This is a really creepy scene to me because he keeps dodging questions about who he is. It’s also sad because this is the last time we see the Evans cottage set in the whole series. It’s one of the original sets from the earliest days of the show’s life (it first appeared way back in Episode 3.)

Back to the Antique Shop and everybody is stepping over each other’s lines! That is part of the charm of this show.

So would you do what the Todds do at the end of this episode? Want to open a mysterious box so badly that you just happen to find the key in an envelope? Neither would I.

Episode 892 – Wednesday 11/27/69

So there is a scroll inside the box with a mysterious message. The Todds naturally think its weird but then have a debate about having spaghetti for dinner for like the umpteenth night in a row. Such unusual dialogue for Dark Shadows!

Then Barnabas shows up in a dream of Megan Todd and says that the room she’s in must be prepared for something. I can just see all the Barnabas fans in the audience throwing things at their TV sets in protest of our favorite vampire being 150% evil now. Oh, and Phillip had the same dream and walks in with lumber to board up the windows.

Let’s be clear here, both Greg and me are sitting here watching this unfolding and thinking that the audience needs a lot more of a clear explanation as to why Barnabas has turned so so so evil. I think the plot background of the mysterious happenings at that altar are insufficient. Remember when I said miss an episode miss a lot? Oh people who haven’t been watching are way way behind now!

So there’s this cradle…

If I’m not mistaken, this was the same cradle one of Quentin’s children was in back in 1897. But now it will be the recipient of a child you don’t want to mess with.

So Maggie is in the Blue Whale with Carolyn trying to pressure her to have another drink and Paul Stoddard shows up again and decides to properly introduce himself at long last. If only his name wasn’t in the credits five episodes ago it might have been a bigger surprise!

Thursday 11/27/69 – Thanksgiving Day

Dark Shadows was again preempted, this time it was planned for the Thanksgiving holiday. Starting at 2pm that afternoon, ABC Sports carried coverage of a College Football game: Texas Tech at Arkansas. A very big matchup indeed since Arkansas was ranked #2 in the coaches poll at this time. Arkansas won the game 33-0.

Friday 11/28/69 – Episode 893

So we end up with a really soapy scene in which we get lots of plot recap from way back in the summer of 1967. I don’t think a majority of the audience would have remembered the Jason McGuire blackmail plot going on during the early Barnabas days. It’s not a bad idea to get the audience up to speed on it.

I must say, why is Carolyn skeptical for only a brief second then all too trusting?

Unseen baby alert! The Todds have some kind of child now.

Another soapy scene at the front door of Collinwood. Who should be skulking about but David Collins himself, listening at the door. Guess his new lease on life is full of his usual garbage.

So the baby has a name now, Joseph, pulled out of thin air! And who else should come in but Amy Jennings and David and then Paul shows up. Paul is acting mighty weird and now it starts to connect a bit to all the other weird stuff going on already. On a side note, I am loving all of the mysterious cues from the first music cue package that haven’t been heard for a while on the show.

So David in his usual bumbling ways accidentally tore a page in the Leviathan book and then has to steal it. Only he didn’t have it in his hands in the previous scene when he was shooed out of the antique shop. I know, reader, I know, suspend your disbelief. But it is an egregious continuity error.

Megan goes evil/shocked/evil and vows to kill whomever stole the book. This leaves us with a Wednesday cliffhanger pushed back to Friday. I guess it works!?

So, we are one-ish weeks into the story. It’s moving pretty fast, but like I said, I feel some fans are left behind if they didn’t catch the first few episodes. I hate to be in ABC’s network correspondence during the month of December 1969.

Dark Shadows: The Leviathans – Week 1

Episode 886 – Monday 11/17/69

So the Countess duPres shows up just in time and stops Josette from jumping. Fair enough.

Barnabas bites the Countess. OK.

Barnabas convinces Josette to meet him at the old house. Alrighty.

Barnabas discovers an altar. Oh boy. Here we go. A bunch of nonsense dialog from these two white ashen beings in black robes, Oberon and Haza, are doing something to our hero. And that in a nutshell is the beginning of this tragic tale.

Episode 886 – Tuesday 11/18/69

So after a strange ceremony on this altar, Barnabas arises and is 100% pure evil… or so it seems. He’s being referred to as Master and gets this thing called the Leviathan Box.

Remember this box well kids, it will annoy you so much as the weeks go on.

We are now back in the present, to the day, with Dr. Hoffman reading a journal entry. Oh how we missed the great plot expositor that is Julia! Oh, and what’s this, a mysterious man!? Do go on.

I keep trying to put myself in the shoes of the viewers in 1969 who have no idea what in the hell is going on here.

Carolyn is wrapping a Christmas present for her mother. This is a rare reference to the time of year on the show. Believe me, it almost never happens. We also get our first mention of this bloody antique shop. More on that later. Feelings of doom and gloom are permeating this conversation. This is even further driven home when Julia starts hearing voices. I love how Lela Swift uses fast cutting between the portraits of Barnabas and Josette to drive the terror factor up to the max. Add to that the great skill of Grayson Hall as an actor and this is one of the better scenes of the week.

So now we have this old man skulking about. He finds the altar. He is in the old house. Then Julia happens to intercept him. Wuh-oh!

The plot seems good enough at this point. I sincerely think that if someone has missed this episode, they missed some very essential plot points. On your typical soap you could miss one, two, maybe even three episodes and still not miss essential points to understand what has been going on. Not on a show paced like Dark Shadows. Miss an episode and miss a lot!

Episode 888 – Wednesday 11/19/69

So the man has a face and a voice. But the audience still hasn’t a clue as to who he is. (Well, the end credits of this episode will spoil that!)

Antiquing-we-go! Say hello to the Todds, Phillip and Megan. Greg quipped “Oh look, it’s the antique shop ran by Eve and Alan Spaulding!”

It’s great to see Marie Wallace back on the show. The seem normal enough at first. Julia makes a big deal out of a Charles Delaware Tate painting, paying $300 for it (in 2017 money it would be worth $2,003!) OK, so I can grant Julia a pass on this, she is as she explains after the portrait of Quentin.

Alas, Carolyn meets the strange man and verbally kicks him off the property. Forget that the Leviathan altar is there just as a point.

The Todds turn weird towards the end of the episode. Just what do they mean here? And why is that altar splitting apart all of a sudden?

Episode 889 – Thursday 11/20/69

Barnabas appears all of sudden with that box again in the latest edition of Chromakey Theater. Somehow the effect is better utilized here than other times.

Professor Stokes is back and he’s seeing Sabrina Stuart – the victim of Chris Jennings.

Julia and Barnabas are reunited. The box is there, of course. He is acting all strange. Oh yeah, and the box is very old.

So Sabrina is talking all of a sudden and wants to see Carolyn. She warns her that Chris Jennings will try to kill her. There is a device in soap operas called SORAS… Soap Opera Rapid Aging Syndrome. I think we need to come up with some other version of that for people that make miraculous recoveries for the convenience of the plot. There are more crazy examples of this in later years on other soaps.

At the end, Julia wants to open that damn box. We are treated to the first of many times of having just some random person (probably a stagehand) breathe into the boom mic. Are you frightened at 4:26 in the afternoon?

Episode 890 – Friday 11/21/69

Of course Barnabas shows up to prevent Julia from opening the box. I think everyone in the audience knew that was going to happen.

So a mysterious Corey is interested in buying Tate paintings as well. Julia thinks it’s Quentin. That is too easy and such a naive solution, way out of her character. But she can’t stop fawning over how much Barnabas is out of his usual self. The audience is just as confused and mystified. Remember when I said that if you miss a show you miss a lot? It’s been said that people starting writing in when Barnabas went back to evil ways in this plot in protest. I can certainly understand why they did so. Imagine Star Trek fans doing the same should Mr. Spock or Captain Kirk do the same thing. Fans are a strange breed, you never can predict what they are going to do or how they are going to react. Maybe someday I will dig through local newspapers of the period to see if there were a lot of letters to TV mailbags complaining about this.

Oh look, a pentagram!

Barnabas wants guidance from Oberon on how he is to know who the chosen ones are. And, of course, right at the Friday cliffhanger, they are at the door!

So, after one week of this plot where do we stand? I think the massive ticking off of the audience has well and truly started. It’s only going to get worse from here. I don’t know if anything could save the course the writers and producers have went on at this point. There was definitely no turning back.

Dark Shadows: The Leviathans – Week 0

This is the first in a series of blog entries about Dark Shadows. A show that is truly near and dear to my heart.

I could drone on about how much I love this show but let’s cut right to the chase.

Greg and myself have both been watching 5 episodes a week that the audience would have watched exactly 50 years ago. We experience the show how the captive audience experienced it, complete with the Friday cliffhanger. Since 2016, we have enjoyed lots of memorable moments and stories. If you know the show, you know what has happened.

At this point 50 years ago, the 1897 story, which was arguably the best storyline the show ever had in its almost five-year run, was wrapping up and the audience was about to be catapulted into one of the most interesting and daring storylines that they could have tried to continue the momentum that they had built up over the preceding months.

I realize that this isn’t the true beginning of the Leviathan plot, but I want to use these preceding shows for a couple of reasons: To get used to doing this and also to show how good the show is at this point before it’s creepy slight downfall.

I will be giving my thoughts episode by episode. I will not be going into too much detail on the plot, please use my episode guide and follow along!

Episode 881 – Monday 11/10/69

Garth Blackwood, played here by John Harkins, is really trying to chew up the scenery. Not quite on a Shatner level, but he sure leaves his mark on the walls. So much so that he flubs his lines in the teaser/recap of Friday’s cliffhanger.

Roger Davis doesn’t do much better. Through his eagerness, he has to pump the prop gun *five* times before it fires a blank.

So Petofi wants to change minds with Quentin a second time. Quentin Collins of course expects this. So why does he delay leaving? I would leave IMMEDIATELY!

The technical effect used during Pansy Faye’s second sight is quite good for the time. I am always amazed at what they could pull off with limited means of the era.

This 1897 plot has always been rock solid in so many ways. I don’t have enough time to describe them. My concern for Quentin is always at its peak, especially now. I suspect there isn’t a person in the 1969 audience who would even remotely be on Count Petofi’s side.

There is another viewing angle to note on this particular date… I defer to another great blog, Dark Shadows Everyday, to expand on that matter.

Episode 882 – Tuesday 11/11/69

Quentin has to stay awake to avoid the mind switch. Hasn’t anyone thought of using a carriage? A horse? Something else? These are the kinds of dilemmas that are all to absent in the plot to come.

Angelique is making a very hard plea here in her description of why she was granted a reprieve from the great fiasco she had in 1968! At least she wasn’t forced to keep wearing that black wig and green dress.

Of course they have to sing “I Wanna Dance With You” again, they have a record to sell! Problem is it didn’t sell that well.

Surely someone could try giving Quentin coffee to keep him awake!

But, alas, someone is caught trying to do something good by the bad person. A standard soap opera trope!

Episode 883 – Wednesday 11/12/69

Oh that hand. One last time it rears its ugly head.

There are all sorts of audio issues throughout this episode. The technical oriented side of me (blast having a career in this medium) notices this every time!

The great thing about a story that you have been following for months is watching the character you have hated get their comeuppance.

Why couldn’t Pansy Faye find the portrait of Quentin with her second sight before? It’s just a convenient plot point, isn’t it?

Episode 884 – Thursday 11/13/69

It’s sad to see the Evans cottage set go. It was one of the original sets from the beginning.

It’s also so sad to see the end of this part of the Quentin and Amanda story. If you’ve seen the show before, you know this isn’t the end for them. To be continued…

Now Kitty shows up and we start to get to the meat and potatoes of what leads up to the Leviathans. While Barnabas is trying to convince Kitty to do what is best for her, Jonathan Frid commits a very egregious flubbed line…

“To go among strangers…well, no one will love you nor you or Kitty or Josette.”

Barnabas Collins – 1897

You had to admire Judith for thinking out this entire plan in what seems like no time. Driving a scheming bastard like Gregory Trask to his comeuppance with great elegance. I will spare you the non-gory details. It’s not gory of course because the reader must remember that this is daytime television in 1969 and things aren’t very suggestive yet.

But, what is suggestive is how you can pull off the special effects in 1969 of having Kitty and Barnabas fade into the portrait of Josette duPres.

Episode 885 – Friday 11/14/69

So Kitty and Barnabas have both ended up in the past. Correction: Josette. Confused yet? So now we’re back in 1795… or 1796… or 1797… whatever the writers feel like referring to this time as.

So now we see all of the things that took place 460 episodes ago. Well, not quite the same. Or will it be? Josette is at the cliff of Widow’s Hill yet again, but as any good Friday cliffhanger would do, she doesn’t know what to do! At least this is a better cliffhanger (literally) than episode 425 in which she jumped! Maybe it’ll turn out different? Who knows. We’ll find out Monday.

Now, if the viewer back then had no indication that things were about to change, they certainly got a big clue from ABC. Have a listed to the audio of the closing credits from the original broadcast:

Indeed. See you next week!

RIP To 2 Shows I Watched

The toughest part of watching a TV show religiously is when a show gets cancelled.  It’s become a thing that you have to get used to.  Two shows I loved were “The Real O’Neals” and “American Crime.”

Read: More shows got the axe at ABC too (article from A.V. Club)

O’Neals was a funny comedy centered around Kenny O’Neal, who is in a catholic family and in the pilot, comes out of the closet.  Hilarity ensued for two great seasons.  Unfortunately, this season, it was on against the hot drama, “This Is Us”,  and it got trounced week after week in the ratings.  I loved the cast of this show, especially Martha Plimpton as Eileen O’Neal, she has great comedic talent.

“American Crime” was a show that was too good to be on network television.  What John Ridley did with this show was nothing short of amazing.  Each season of this show was a new story with new characters, but with many of the same actors.  Regina King, Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton, they were all very dynamic on this show and showed a great range of flexibility in their acting range from year to year.  It’s a shame we won’t see what they can do with a Season Four.  Unless the show finds another home somewhere.  One can only dream.  (Hello Netflix, Hulu, or some other streaming service… are you listening????)

By the way, Connor Jessup is just sexy as hell.  There, I said it. 🙂

Shows get cancelled folks.  It’s nothing to lose sleep over, the world keeps turning on and great actors will find other jobs.  At least that’s what one would hope would happen!

“Star Trek” Season One Thoughts

The first season of a television series is interesting.  The characters are new and have a lot of wiggle room for the audience to get to know them as well as the actors who portray them.  The writers, directors, producers and all the people who create the show also have the same challenge of trying to bring to the screen an interesting, engaging and dynamic piece of storytelling as well.  Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.

And then there’s Star Trek.  You see, it’s the show that broke conventional wisdom.  It was classic from the get-go.  It’s not like they had to try very hard to do well.  The characters were very strong and fresh from the moment they first called “Action!” on the set.  True, the writing may have been a bit suspect at times, but every story had one thing going for it:  it always attempted to be ambitious.

It could be said however that the show had two sides to its season, and it all boiled down to who produced the show.  The first half of the season was produced by the series creator, Gene Roddenberry, and the second half by Gene Coon.  The tale of two Genes has been told in print time and time again, so I’ll save you from regurgitating the background info (go seek out any number of books on this topic if you’re interested) and just give you my thoughts.

You can definitely tell a slight shift in how the characters interacted when Coon arrived.  The one dynamic that Gene Coon brought to the show was the strong bond between Kirk, Spock and McCoy.  That is what I always referred to as the “strong triad” of the show.  If you don’t get that central core relationship right, you don’t have Star Trek.  All of the other themes will naturally fall into place, but what those three do is of vital importance to make any story work.  Look at some of the best episodes, like my favorite, “The City on the Edge of Forever.”  While McCoy make have been doped up on Cordrazine, Kirk and Spock realize that what he did must be corrected, but they never blame him directly for what’s going on.  A lot of TV shows these days would just outright blame him for negligence and make a whole 13 to 22 episode arc out of said negligence.  That’s the reason I don’t get into a lot of new TV shows, by the way.   Where a lot of TV shows fail in my book is that they fail to make me like the characters as well as I like these three.

Before you reach for that comment box, I do watch new TV shows, just the ones with characters I like.

The supporting players are just as vital to the show’s success.  Where else on TV 50 years ago could you see a diverse mix of races all working together on a ship?  Nobody putting the other down or hurling racial epithets at each other?  That aspect was truly ahead of its time.  Sadly, however, in 2017, that kind of acceptance and collaboration is still a challenge for a lot of people.  We all need to work together and treat each other equally, especially now.

You can’t think of this show without thinking of the massive fan support that was generated.  I do think that the network brain trust at NBC certainly was not expecting the massive letter writing campaign that they got to protest the rumors that Star Trek might be cancelled.  I do applaud them for taking the step of not only renewing the show, but making an on-air announcement to such (during the closing credits of “The Devil in the Dark” on March 2nd, 1967.)  I know that if I were around then, I would probably be devouring any information I could find about how to join a fan club and probably writing a letter as well to add to the mass protest that ultimately saved the show from cancellation.

Put simply, what a season!  The first season of any show is the most interesting one in my opinion.  It always is and always will be true.  I firmly believe that.

Easter Movie Tradition

Last night was the yearly tradition of ABC screening the epic Cecil B. DeMille film “The Ten Commandments” starring Charlton Heston.  The film has been broadcast annually by ABC since February 18, 1973.  Check out this ad from the premiere telecast:

This was back in a time when movies on television were a very big event.  It was of course the days before cable and home video pretty much ruined that epic feeling you might have gotten when a great movie was on that you just had to watch.

I thought to myself as this movie was on last night, “You know, this movie has nothing to do with Easter directly.”  True, but people love it more for it being inspirational.  Of course, this movie would be more identified with Passover instead of strictly Easter, so don’t write in or comment that I don’t know my religious holidays, because I do know.

I guess people just love this movie so much and people still turn out to watch it once a year, even though you can readily watch the movie on any number of home video formats that it has been released on over the years.

While “The Ten Commandments” is not my favorite biblical epic, I got to thinking about when my two favorites appeared for the first time on television.

“The Robe” premiered on ABC on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1967.

My favorite film of all time, “Ben-Hur”, premiered on CBS Sunday, February 14, 1971 and was watched by over 85 million people (a record for a movie on TV at the time).

Excuse me, I need to go get my sword and sandals.